Katerina Maskova
1 year ago

Life Happens – the “not enough time” dilemma. Design Thinking to the rescue!

Businesses get busy, we have to hire new staff, new relationships form, babies are born... All those things do regularly happen to yogis who make the decision to run their own studios. And at the same time, our clients expect us to surprise, challenge and delight them with new class material and we only have a limited amount of time in our lives to constantly research new material. Part of our design thinking when developing Asanas For You was focused on how to solve this dilemma for yoga teacher – how to create extra time so you can live your life and not compromise on quality of material for your classes.

 

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Businesses get busy, we have to hire new staff, new relationships form, babies are born... All those things do regularly happen to yogis who make the decision to run their own studios. And at the same time, our clients expect us to surprise, challenge and delight them with new class material and we only have a limited amount of time in our lives to constantly research new material. Part of our design thinking when developing Asanas For You was focused on how to solve this dilemma for yoga teacher – how to create extra time so you can live your life and not compromise on quality of material for your classes.

There is lots of stuff out there on design thinking in the internet and we would encourage you to use at least some of process whilst you’re thinking about your own yoga businesses. We mentioned the need for clarifying your Purpose in our previous blog post, and it is hugely important to have that clearly defined. Design thinking helps you to operationalise your purpose in an efficient way. It’s a very simple, yet critical 5 step process:

Empathise: gain empathetic understanding of the problem you are trying to solve (you got a “hunch” that a yoga studio is needed in the area – get deeper understanding why this might be the case – observe, engage and understand people’s experiences and motivations; understand what will help and hinder your idea’s development).

Define: define the problem or what you are trying to do in a human centric way, based on the information gathered in the Empathise phase. This is where your Purpose comes into play as well. This stage will help you to identify the features, functions and other elements that will be important to obtaining your desired end state (including your business model).

Ideate: you understand users’ needs, have analysed and synthesised your observations (defined your problem in human centric way), now it’s time to come up with ideas on how to do solve the problem (what can be done). There are many tools that can help with ideation: be creative, don’t limit your ideas and refrain from prematurely dismissing radical ideas.

Prototype: build simple, scaled down prototypes of your product (e.g. design some  short classes or yoga education seminars). This phase is a very important part of the process that could save you lots of resources before you invest them in the “wrong” product.

Test: a “must do” element of design thinking which unfortunately is skipped by so many people. Do run those free classes (that you designed as prototypes) in the local park or community hall to test the appetite in the local community. Design Thinking is an iterative process that relies on a cycle of prototypes and testing. Test class formats, styles, moods, etc.

The beauty of design thinking is that it does not end when you “officially” open your business – it can remain of a core of your business evolution throughout. We certainly keep it at the forefront of our thinking when it comes to serving our community of subscribers better.

 Wishing you all a fruitful day! Namaste!

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